COMMUNITY IMPACT

 PERPETUATING CULTURE // SHARING ALOHA

Mai Kinohi Mai: Surfing in Hawaiʻi

Bishop Museum logo

LOCATION
Honolulu, Hawaiʻi

ORGANIZATION
Bishop Museum

GIVEBACK TYPE
Cultural Program Sponsorship

DETAILS
As part of our mission to support Native Hawaiian cultural programs, DAWSON made a donation to Bishop as a major sponsor of the surfing exhibition Mai Kinohi Mai: Surfing in Hawaiʻi, on view from 2019-2020. “Mai Kinohi Mai” means “from the beginning” in Hawaiian; the exhibition traces the history and culture of surfing from its origins as a Hawaiian sport to the present day.

Bishop Museum is widely considered to have the greatest assemblage of surfboards in the world because of the breadth of its collection and the various eras represented. The exhibition features a display of storied surfboards, from the oldest known traditional wooden surfboards to boards belonging to famed Hawaiʻi surfers like Duke Kahanamoku and Rell Sunn. Other highlights include a video wall showcasing Native Hawaiian surf stories and surf videos from the early 20th century until today. Visitors are also invited to experience a simulated 30 foot wave designed to replicate Duke’s legendary 1917 Waikiki ride.

Mai Kinohi Mai: Surfing in Hawaiʻi

Bishop Museum logo
LOCATION
Honolulu, Hawaiʻi

ORGANIZATION
Bishop Museum

GIVEBACK TYPE
Cultural Program Sponsorship

DETAILS

As part of our mission to support Native Hawaiian cultural programs, DAWSON made a donation to Bishop Museum as a major sponsor of the surfing exhibition Mai Kinohi Mai: Surfing in Hawaiʻi, on view from 2019-2020. “Mai Kinohi Mai” means “from the beginning” in Hawaiian; the exhibition traces the history and culture of surfing from its origins as a Hawaiian sport to the present day.

Bishop Museum is widely considered to have the greatest assemblage of surfboards in the world because of the breadth of its collection and the various eras represented. The exhibition features a display of storied surfboards, from the oldest known traditional wooden surfboards to boards belonging to famed Hawaii surfers like Duke Kahanamoku and Rell Sunn. Other highlights include a video wall showcasing Native Hawaiian surf stories and surf videos from the early 20th century until today. Visitors are also able to experience a simulated 30 foot wave designed to replicate Duke’s legendary 1917 Waikiki ride.